Treatments & Services

A full array of contemporary diagnostic imaging services with all the benefits of advanced technology are available at York Hospital to give you fast, accurate and detailed examinations. Services include:


Diagnostic X-ray

A x-ray examination is a very safe, quick and easy way to see bones and organs inside the body. Most diagnostic x-ray exams do not require any preparation. We try to schedule your appointment at a time that is convenient for you. You may be asked to remove your jewelry or other articles of clothing to prevent them from make something the body part being examined, difficult to see.

What will happen in the x-ray room? A Radiologic Technologist will perform your examination and will explain the procedure and answer any questions you may have. The technologist will review the images to ensure they are of excellent diagnostic quality and includes all the necessary information needed for interpretation.

How long will the test take? Most exams take approximately 15-20 minutes.

How do I prepare for this test? Most general Radiology examinations to not require any type of preparation.

Obtaining your test results: Now that your images for diagnostic testing have been obtained, our staff will proceed to expedite the reporting process. The radiologist will review the x-rays and send the results to your physician, usually within 48 hours. Your doctor will explain the test results with you. If you need copies of your x-rays or test results, please let us know and we will be happy to provide this information to you.

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Ultrasound

An ultrasound, also known as sonography, uses sound waves to produce images of organs, vessels and tissues within the body. A small hand held transducer is placed in contact with the patients' body. It emits inaudible sound waves that pass through the body, sending back “echoes” as they bounce off organs, vessel walls, and tissues. A special computer than converts these echoes into images.

What will happen in the Ultrasound room? A sonographer will perform this examination. You will be asked to lie on a table while the sonographer uses a transducer to scan over the parts of the body that need to be imaged. You may be asked to change positions during the examination so that images can be obtained at different angles.

How long will the test take? Total exam times can range from 30-60 minutes depending upon the body part being examined. The sonographer will check the images before you leave to ensure that they are of excellent diagnostic quality and includes all the necessary information needed for interpretation.

How do I prepare for this test? Before your examination, the sonographer will explain the procedure to you and answer any questions you may have. Depending upon the type of study you are scheduled for, you may be asked not to eat or drink anything 8 hours prior to your examination. In addition, you may be asked to drink water before your examination because sound waves travel more easily through fluid. Again, this depends upon the type of examination you are scheduled for. Many ultrasounds do not require any preparation. You may take medication as needed with a small sip of water.

Obtaining your test results: Now that your images for diagnostic testing have been obtained, our staff will proceed to expedite the reporting process. The radiologist will review the x-rays and send the results to your physician, usually within 48 hours. Your doctor will explain the test results with you. If you need copies of your x-rays or test results, please let us know and we will be happy to provide this information to you.

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Nuclear Medicine

A nuclear medicine procedure is sometimes described as an “inside out” x-ray because it records radiation emitting from the patient's body rather than radiation that is directed through the patient’s body. Small amounts of radioactive material are introduced into the body by injection, inhalation or swallowing. The radioactive material travels through the body and emits radioactive emissions. A special camera detects these emissions in the organs, bones or tissue being imaged and records them on a special computer.

What will happen in the nuclear medicine room? A nuclear medicine technologist will perform this examination. You will be asked to lie under or over a special camera (gamma camera). This camera will slide over or under your body detecting the emitted radiation and a special computer will record these images. You may be asked to change positions during the examination as images are taken from the front, back and sometimes the side.

How long will the test take? Depending upon the type of examination, the average scans take 30-60 minutes. However, there may be a delay between the time of the injection and the actual scan being done. Again, the technologist will coordinate and explain the process to you.

How do I prepare for this test? Before your examination, the nuclear medicine technologist will explain the procedure to you and answer any questions you may have. Your appointment can be scheduled at any time during the day. Each exam is very different and if a prep is required, the technologist will explain it to you prior to the examination. You may take any needed medication prior to the scan.

Obtaining your test results: Now that your images for diagnostic testing have been obtained, our staff will proceed to expedite the reporting process. The radiologist will review the x-rays and send the results to your physician, usually within 48 hours. Your doctor will explain the test results with you. If you need copies of your x-rays or test results, please let us know and we will be happy to provide this information to you.

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CT Scan

A CT SCAN is a sophisticated type of x-ray examination that has the ability of showing anatomy at different levels within the body. This ability, known as cross sectional imaging, is possible because the x-ray source rotates around the patient's body. Each rotation of the x-ray beam produces a “slice” of anatomy. Using this technology, physicians can view the inside of the body, a feat not possible with general x-rays.

What will happen in the CT room? A CT technologist will administer the test and will explain the procedure and answer any questions you may have. The technologist will position you on the scanning table and guide you into the scanner. You will be secure on the table while the CT tube rotates around you taking the images. The table moves through the scanner while obtaining images of the body. Even the slightest movement can blur the image so it is important that you hold very still during the scan. The technologist will stand behind a lead glass window but will always be able to hear and talk to you.

How long will the test take? Most CT scans take between 15-30 minutes. The radiologist(x-ray doctor) may request delayed or additional “slices” depending on what the initial scan reveals. Often times, thinner slices are required to better delineate anatomic structures.

How do I prepare for this test? Before your examination, the CT technologist will explain the procedure to you and answer any questions you may have. Depending upon the type of study you are scheduled for, you may be asked not to eat or drink anything 3 hours prior to your examination. In addition, you may be asked to drink some barium and be given an intravenous contrast material. Again, this depends upon the type of examination you are scheduled for. Many CT scans do not require any preparation.

Obtaining your test results: Now that your images for diagnostic testing have been obtained, our staff will proceed to expedite the reporting process. The radiologist will review the x-rays and send the results to your physician, usually within 48 hours. Your doctor will explain the test results with you. If you need copies of your x-rays or test results, please let us know and we will be happy to provide this information to you.

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MRI (Magnetic Resonance Imaging)

An MRI is a sophisticated diagnostic technique that uses a magnetic field, radio waves and a computer to generate detailed, cross-sectional images of the human body. It produces better soft tissue images than x-rays can. MRI can be used to image most the body.

What will happen in the scan room? A MRI technologist will position you on the table and guide you into the MRI unit. You will be secure on the table and you won’t feel anything. You will hear intermittent humming, clicking and knocking sounds. These are normal sounds coming from the magnet. You will be able to wear special ear plugs to help mask the sounds generated by the magnet. For most exams, the technologist will wrap a “coil” around the body part being examined. This coil helps concentrate the radio-frequency pulses. The technologist will stand behind a window but will always be able to hear and talk to you.

How long will the test take? Most MRI scans take between 45-60 minutes. You will be asked to remove all jewelry, watches, and any other metallic items on your clothing.

How do I prepare for this test? Before your examination, the MRI technologist will explain the procedure to you and answer any questions you may have. MRI is a safe procedure but is not recommended for pregnant women. During an MRI, the body is exposed to a strong magnetic field. Patients with a pacemaker, cochlear implants, or aneurysm clips should check with their physician prior to undergoing an MRI procedure. Patients who have been exposed to shrapnel or whose eyes have been exposed to metal shavings might not be candidates for an MRI. If you are claustrophobic or experience pain when lying on your back, please let your physician know. He or she may be able to prescribe a relaxant or pain medication prior to the examination. We suggest you come to your appointment in comfortable, non metallic clothing. You may take needed medication as prescribed by your physician.

Obtaining your test results: Now that your images for diagnostic testing have been obtained, our staff will proceed to expedite the reporting process. The radiologist will review the x-rays and send the results to your physician, usually within 48 hours. Your doctor will explain the test results with you. If you need copies of your x-rays or test results, please let us know and we will be happy to provide this information to you.

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Barium Enema

A Barium enema is an x-ray exam of the colon (also known as the large intestines) It is sometimes called a BE or Air contrast Enema.

What will happen in the x-ray room? A radiologist (x-ray doctor) and technologist are in the exam room to administer the test and will explain the procedure and answer any questions you may have. Your colon will be filled with a liquid barium and air that coat the coat so it can be seen on x-rays. You will be asked to move into different positions as the doctor watches these images on a special television screen. You will be asked to hold your breath so that special pictures of your colon can be obtained. The technologist will also take still pictures of your colon after the radiologist has completed filming his series of pictures.

How long will the test take? The exam of your colon will take 45-60 minutes.

How do I prepare for this test? Appointments are generally scheduled in the morning. You will be instructed to take a bowel cleansing prep prior to this test to ensure the colon is clear of stool. We ask that you follow the prep and instructions that we give you. You should not eat or drink anything after midnight or in the morning on the day of your test. You may take your medications with a small sip of water if needed. You will be able to eat as soon as the test is over. It is important to remember to drink plenty of fluids after the test to help move the barium out of your system.

Obtaining your test results: Now that your images for diagnostic testing have been obtained, our staff will proceed to expedite the reporting process. The radiologist will review the x-rays and send the results to your physician, usually within 48 hours. Your doctor will explain the test results with you. If you need copies of your x-rays or test results, please let us know and we will be happy to provide this information to you.

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Bone Density (Dexa) Scan

Bone densitometry is a type of imaging examination that measures a patient's bone mineral density, which is an indicator of bone strength. It can be used to determine if the patient has osteoporosis, a degenerative disease that causes bones to become brittle and makes them likelier to break.

What will happen in the x-ray room? A technologist will be in the exam room to administer the test and will explain the procedure and answer any questions you may have. The technologist will position you on a padded table and ask you to remain as still as possible during the test. The technologist then will use the DEXA equipment to scan one or more areas of bone, usually the lower spine and hip. The equipment works by measuring the amount of x-rays that are absorbed by the bones in your body.

How long will the test take? The exam takes 15 to 20 minutes.

How do I prepare for this test? Before your examination, the technologist will explain the procedure to you and answer any questions you may have. Bone density is a safe procedure utilizing only a small amount of radiation. You will be allowed to remain in your regular clothing during the examination. It is a good idea to wear a comfortable outfit without snaps and zippers so that it does not interfere with the picture. Calcium supplements and vitamins containing calcium should be withheld for 24 hours before your examination.

Obtaining your test results: Now that your images for diagnostic testing have been obtained, our staff will proceed to expedite the reporting process. The radiologist will review the x-rays and send the results to your physician, usually within 48 hours. Your doctor will explain the test results with you. If you need copies of your x-rays or test results, please let us know and we will be happy to provide this information to you.

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GI series

A GI or gastrointestinal series is an x-ray exam of the esophagus(the tube leading from the mouth to the stomach), the stomach and sometimes the small bowel. You need to drink a liquid called barium for this test. It is also called an Upper GI. Sometime a GI with small bowel follow through is requested. In this case, the barium liquid ingested will be followed throughout the small intestines. This procedure could take up to 4 hours or sometimes longer. Images are generally taken every half hour until the barium reaches the end of the small bowel.

What will happen in the x-ray room? A radiologist(x-ray doctor) and technologist are in the exam room to administer the test and will explain the procedure and answer any questions you may have. Before the x-rays are taken, you will be asked to swallow granules similar to Alka-Seltzer that fill your stomach with air; then you will be given a mildly flavored liquid called barium to drink which fills the stomach and intestines so they can be seen on x-rays. The doctor watches these images on a special television screen; you will be asked to move into different positions and to hold your breath so pictures can be taken.

How long will the test take? The exam of your esophagus and stomach may take 30-45 minutes. If the Upper GI includes a small bowel (intestine) follow through then the procedure could take up to four hours. In some cases it may even take longer; it depends on how fast the barium moves through your intestines. Pictures are taken every half hour to watch the movement of barium through the intestine.

How do I prepare for this test? Appointments are generally scheduled in the morning. You should not eat or drink anything after midnight or in the morning on the day of your test. You may take your medications with a small sip of water if needed. You will be able to eat as soon as the test is over. It is important to remember to drink plenty of fluids after the test to help move the barium out of your system.

Obtaining your test results: Now that your images for diagnostic testing have been obtained, our staff will proceed to expedite the reporting process. The radiologist will review the x-rays and send the results to your physician, usually within 48 hours. Your doctor will explain the test results with you. If you need copies of your x-rays or test results, please let us know and we will be happy to provide this information to you.

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IVP

An IVP or Intravenous Pyelogram is an x-ray examination of the kidneys, ureters and bladder. You will need an injection of contrast material so that we can see these structures.

What will happen in the x-ray room? A technologist will perform this examination. You will be asked some brief questions in regards to allergies and your medical history. You will be asked to sign a consent form so that we may use a special x-ray dye (also called contrast media). We will inject this dye into a vein (usually in the arm) and take pictures while following the path of the dye as it travels through the body. After the test, you will be asked to empty your bladder and the dye will then be excreted.

How long will the test take? An IVP generally takes 60 minutes. The radiologist (x-ray doctor) may request delayed or additional pictures depending on what the pictures reveal.

How do I prepare for this test? Appointments are generally scheduled in the morning. You will be instructed to take a bowel cleansing prep prior to this examination so that the bowel is clear of stool. We ask that you follow the prep and instructions we give you. You may you’re your medications with a small sip of water if needed. If you are a diabetic and take insulin or another medication for diabetes, we will check with your doctor to see if your medication needs to be adjusted for this exam. You will be able to eat as soon as the test is over.

Obtaining your test results: Now that your images for diagnostic testing have been obtained, our staff will proceed to expedite the reporting process. The radiologist will review the x-rays and send the results to your physician, usually within 48 hours. Your doctor will explain the test results with you. If you need copies of your x-rays or test results, please let us know and we will be happy to provide this information to you.

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PET Scan (Positron Emission Tomography)

A PET scan is a unique imaging test that helps doctors see how organs and tissues inside your body are functioning. The test involves an injection of a radioisotope also known as a radiotracer. This tracer travels through the body and is absorbed by the organs and tissues being studied. A special camera detects the energy given off by the tracer substance and records them on a special computer.

What will happen in the PET scan room? A technologist will perform this examination. You will be asked to lie under or over a special camera. This camera will slide over or under your body detecting the emitted energy from the tracer and a special computer will record these images. You will be asked to hold still throughout the entire exam.

How do I prepare for this test? Before your examination, the technologist will explain the procedure to you and answer any questions you may have. When your appointment is scheduled, you will be given the appropriate prep information, depending on the type of PET scan your doctor is requesting.

How long will the test take? Once you have been given the radioisotope injection, you will be asked to relax for approximately 45-60 minutes. This will enable the radioisotope to travel throughout your body and be absorbed into the organs and tissues being examined. The scan itself will take between 30-60 minutes.

Obtaining your test results: Now that your images for diagnostic testing have been obtained, our staff will proceed to expedite the reporting process. The radiologist will review the x-rays and send the results to your physician, usually within 48 hours. Your doctor will explain the test results with you. If you need copies of your x-rays or test results, please let us know and we will be happy to provide this information to you.

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Locations & Contact

York Hospital Imaging Services
15 Hospital Drive York, Maine 03909
Phone: (207) 351-2339

Interventional Radiology
15 Hospital Drive York, Maine 03909
Phone: (207) 361-6989

York Hospital In Kittery Imaging Services
35 Walker Street Kittery, Maine 03904
Phone: (207) 439-4430

York Hospital in Berwick Imaging Services
4 Dana Drive Berwick, Maine 03901
Phone: (207) 698-6700

York Hospital in South Berwick Imaging Services
57 Portland Street South Berwick, Maine 03908
Phone: (207) 384-8130

York Hospital in Wells Imaging Services
114 Sanford Road, Route 109 Wells, Maine 04090
Phone: (207) 646-5211

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